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    Green growth at Copenhagen Airport

    Green growth at Copenhagen Airport


    After a record 2018 in which more than 30 million travellers passed through Copenhagen Airport, the first quarter of this year has seen a 1.2 percent increase. In particular, the airport has seen growth of 8-10 percent in the number of transfer...

    After a record 2018 in which more than 30 million travellers passed through Copenhagen Airport, the first quarter of this year has seen a 1.2 percent increase.

    In particular, the airport has seen growth of 8-10 percent in the number of transfer passengers and intercontinental travellers, underlining Copenhagen’s status as a northern European hub.

    Climate plan
    In March this year, CPH Kastrup embarked upon a new climate strategy when the award-winning airport introduced an ambitious initiative.

    Goals include becoming CO2-neutral in 2019 and for emission-free transport to and from the airport by 2030. The need for such a plan has been emphasised by the continued passenger growth.

    Compensating for emissions
    “As a first step, we have decided to make the airport CO2-neutral as early as this year,” explained Copenhagen Airport chief executive Thomas Woldbye.

    “We compensate every kilo of CO2 by investing in projects that remove at least the same amount of CO2.”

    Retail playing a role
    The various retail outlets are also playing their part by reducing the use of plastics and improving waste management.  Food waste is now being collected and used for the production of bio-gas.

    These actions complement wider government and EU strategies that set long-term goals for a climate-neutral Europe by 2050.  

    Expansion and efficiency
    Copenhagen has been named the most efficient airport in Europe on more than one occasion – achieved largely due to the automation of processes.

    Terminals two and three have recently been expanded and the addition of 80,000 sqm between gates B and C in T2 will be completed by 2028.

     

    Check, mate! Norwegian chess comet shows who’s boss in no uncertain terms

    Check, mate! Norwegian chess comet shows who’s boss in no uncertain terms


    Chess is pretty hip these days and the 28-year-old Norwegian master Magnus Carlsen is one of the people who has helped to make it so. Carlsen blew into town yesterday to take part in the Energi Danmark Champions Battle, a high-profile chess event at...

    Chess is pretty hip these days and the 28-year-old Norwegian master Magnus Carlsen is one of the people who has helped to make it so.

    Carlsen blew into town yesterday to take part in the Energi Danmark Champions Battle, a high-profile chess event at Copenhagen’s Cirkusbygningen.

    READ ALSO: Norwegian chess legend coming to Denmark

    Twenty-four players were swept off the board by Carlsen in under an hour and a half in a sparkling display of simultaneous chess, reports DR Nyheder.

    “There were a number of strong players, so it wasn’t easy, but I have quite a bit of experience,” Carlsen said modestly from the stage after the match.

    Up-and-coming Dane
    After the simultaneous chess Carlsen took on Jonas Buhl Bjerre, a 14-year-old rated the second-best player in Denmark.

    Bjerre narrowly lost to grand master Allan Stig Rasmussen in a tournament in April and is potentially one of the greatest chess talents Denmark has ever produced.

    However, Carlsen was too big a mouthful for Bjerre to swallow, and he lost twice in little over an hour.

    Carlsen won the world title in 2013 and has successfully defended it since. He has also won the world title in blitz chess four times and twice in rapid chess.

    Prior to the chess games, Carlsen relaxed with a visit to Copenhagen Zoo and Tivoli and by playing a bit of street basket.

    Danish parties stepping up social media funding

    Danish parties stepping up social media funding


    With the general election looming on June 5, Danish parties are starting to really shell out the big bucks on social media in an effort to garner as many votes as possible. Socialdemokratiet is leading the way in style, having spent about 325,000 kroner...

    With the general election looming on June 5, Danish parties are starting to really shell out the big bucks on social media in an effort to garner as many votes as possible.

    Socialdemokratiet is leading the way in style, having spent about 325,000 kroner on 17 ad campaigns between May 14 and 20. Party head Mette Frederiksen has accounted for about 160,000 kroner of that.

    Konservative has forked out over 210,000 kroner in second, while Venstre has paid around 200,000 kroner – though PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen has only spent a little over 6,000 kroner on himself.

    Anders Samuelsen (Liberal Alliance), Uffe Elbæk (Alternativet), Pernille Vermund (Nye Borgerlige) and Rasmus Paludan (Stram Kurs) are the only party heads who did not pay for Facebook ads between May 14 and 20 . In total, Danish parties spent 1.2 million kroner on Facebook ads that week.

    However, probably the most eyebrow-raising social media ad expense probably came from MP Joachim B Olsen, who made waves recently by putting an ad on Pornhub.

    READ ALSO: Danish politician takes out election ad on Pornhub

    Mailing in votes
    In related news, more and more Danes are turning to the postal services when it comes to voting in general, local and EU elections.

    In the general election in 2015, over 300,000 Danes voted by mail – roughly 9 percent of all votes registered. And in the last EU election, 140,000 Danes voted by mail – about 6 percent of all votes.

    People most inclined to vote via mail came from municipalities in or around Copenhagen and, perhaps more predictably, smaller island municipalities such as Ærø and Samsø.

    Gentofte saw the highest share of mail votes at 16.7 percent in 2015, followed by Frederiksberg (15 percent) and Rudersdal (14.3). The lowest shares of mailed  votes were found in Brønderslev (5 percent), Vejen (5.6) and Jammerbugt (5.8).

    A country-wide shortage of home helpers is becoming a major headache

    A country-wide shortage of home helpers is becoming a major headache


    More and more people in Denmark are living to a ripe old age and the area of public sector care for the elderly is growing. The trouble is that there are just not enough people going into the field to cope with the demand. At present, Copenhagen...

    More and more people in Denmark are living to a ripe old age and the area of public sector care for the elderly is growing. The trouble is that there are just not enough people going into the field to cope with the demand.

    At present, Copenhagen Municipality has around 40 posts advertised on job portals. Around half of them are in the area that covers Amager, Christianshavn, Vesterbro and Valby, and the other half in Nørrebro, Bispebjerg, Vanløse, Østerbro and the city centre.

    Accentuate the positive
    “We have a major task – not only in Copenhagen but also country-wide – underlining the importance of work carried out in the fields of eldercare and nursing. Their contribution is invaluable,” said Copenhagen’s deputy mayor for social issues, Mia Nyegaard.

    Kommunernes Landsforening, the country-wide association of municipalities, estimates that 15,000 additional people will be required over the next five years.

    “This is a major social problem that will take a lot of effort to solve. What we can do is to be better at promoting this area and telling people about all the good these people do, along with the rewarding things that can be found in the home help and nursing sectors,” said Nyegaard.

    Government wants women in Danish special forces

    Government wants women in Danish special forces


    Gender equality in the military could very well extend to include Danish special forces in the near future, according to the defence minister, Claus Hjort Frederiksen. Frederiksen has proposed that a special department be set up to prepare women to join...

    Gender equality in the military could very well extend to include Danish special forces in the near future, according to the defence minister, Claus Hjort Frederiksen.

    Frederiksen has proposed that a special department be set up to prepare women to join the three elite groups: Jaeger Corps, Frogman Corps and the Sirius Dog Sled Patrol.

    Several women have tried to qualify for the three elite units over the years, but none have made it past the rigorous training program thus far.

    About 7 percent of all employees in Danish Defence are women and Frederiksen wants that share to also increase.

    Should the defence minister retain his position following the upcoming general elections, the initiative will be ushered in sometime next year.

    READ MORE: Denmark eyes air force presence in Greenland as Russia expands in Arctic

    F35 makes its debut
    Denmark is due to replace its fleet of ageing F16 fighters with 27 new F35s starting in 2023, and yesterday the replacement type landed in Denmark for the first time.

    Two F35s from the Norwegian Air Force landed at Flyvestation Skrydstrup in Jutland as part of a demonstration that involved flying a Danish F16 and then a F35 along two special routes over south Jutland.

    One of the purposes was for local residents to hear the noise-level difference between the F16 and F35. The issue has been contentious as noise generated by the heavier F35, powered by Pratt & Whitney engines, will exceed accepted noise limits for over 600 homes surrounding the airport.

    Check out a video of the F35 demo below.

    When porn was born: Denmark had its own Moon landing moment in 19 … 69

    When porn was born: Denmark had its own Moon landing moment in 19 … 69


    On July 20, the world will be marking the 50th anniversary of man walking on the Moon, but Denmark has its own 50-year landmark to celebrate, which involved more than just a few pocket-rockets taking off in aptly-named 19 … 69. In May 1969, Denmark...

    On July 20, the world will be marking the 50th anniversary of man walking on the Moon, but Denmark has its own 50-year landmark to celebrate, which involved more than just a few pocket-rockets taking off in aptly-named 19 … 69.

    In May 1969, Denmark became the first country in the world to legalise pornography in a pictorial form, two years after lifting a ban that effectively permitted written pornography.

    And starting from May 30, the DFI national film institute will be showing a collection of ten films at Cinemateket in Copenhagen to pay tribute to the porn pioneers who changed the way we viewed sex forever.

    Not just blue movies
    The program, which has been curated by Jesper Andersen, includes a number of pre-1969 films that explore the pros and cons of legalising pornography.

    As the feature 1966 film ’Gift’ warned, it would be a free-for-all for sub-genres such as bestiality, and Denmark didn’t end up sufficiently legislating against such films until the last decade.

    While two of the other pre-1969 films –  ’Jeg – en kvinde’ (1965) and ’Uden en trævl’ (1968) – were works of pornography and swiftly banned, enabling them to be in pole position once the legalisation was approved.

    Also included are several documentaries that reflected on the widespread international outcry.

    Relatively mainstream
    One element that might surprise film fans 50 years on is how some of the country’s most popular actors – such as Poul Bundgaard, Karl Stegger and Arthur Jensen – appeared in the early porns.

    The Stjernetegns (star sign) series were probably the best known porn films in the early 1970s, and the program includes three of its movies: ’Mazurka på sengekanten’ (1970), ’I jomfruens tegn’ (1973) and ’Der må være en sengekant’ (1975).

    But pornography quickly ceased to be mainstream when the women’s liberation movement started to question its values, and the whole genre quickly lost its avant-garde status.

    Invasive plant closes lakes in Zealand nature park

    Invasive plant closes lakes in Zealand nature park


    Hedeland Nature Park in Hedehusene near Roskilde is struggling to deal with what appears to be the contents of someone’s fish tank. The Carolina fanwort – a sub-tropical plant originating in northeast and southeast America, which is a favourite of...

    Hedeland Nature Park in Hedehusene near Roskilde is struggling to deal with what appears to be the contents of someone’s fish tank.

    The Carolina fanwort – a sub-tropical plant originating in northeast and southeast America, which is a favourite of many a home aquarium owner – has turned up in two lakes, Fiskesø and Hundesø, in the national park.

    READ ALSO: Self-fertilising invasive crayfish discovered in Denmark

    It is believed the plant has been spread through someone dumping water from their aquarium, reports TV2 Lorry.

    In order to minimise the chance of the plant spreading, the Miljøstyrelsen environmental authority has recommended the lakes be closed off.

    Hair of the dog
    The plant spreads when small pieces get caught up in fishing equipment, a dog’s coat or the legs of a horse etc – so dogs and horses will not be allowed to use the lake whilst Miljøstyrelsen cleans it up.

    As well as being very easily spread, Carolina fanwort is regarded as a pest because it displaces the local flora.

    According to a post on the website of the local fishing club Hedeland Fiskesø: “The Miljøstyrelsen’s biologists are extremely worried that the plant will spread to other lakes, so the lake will have to be cleaned, which means draining it.”

    There is also a ban on fishing until further notice.

    Business Round-Up: Fitch names Denmark as fetching nation for wind power investment

    Business Round-Up: Fitch names Denmark as fetching nation for wind power investment


    International credit rating agency Fitch has identified Denmark as a top investment destination for wind power over the next decade. It praised government support, along with the country’s willingness to overcome transmission and legislative...

    International credit rating agency Fitch has identified Denmark as a top investment destination for wind power over the next decade. It praised government support, along with the country’s willingness to overcome transmission and legislative challenges, according to windpowermonthly.com.

    Plans for offshore capacity additions were praised – namely the 2.4 GW outlined in the government’s 2018 Energy Agreement and the 12.4 GW detailed in future projects by the Danish Energy Agency – with Fitch predicting wind power will remain a dominant source of electricity output in the country.

    Full of praise
    The country’s auction system, which enabled renewables to compete on the same basis as conventional power sources in December 2018, which led to several onshore wind projects successfully securing a grid connection, was also commended.

    Fitch predicts 3 percent year-on-year growth over the next decade in Denmark – an understandable decline on the 8 percent year-on-year growth between 2008 and 2018 due to the “mature nature of the market”.

    Blue is the colour, Maersk’s is the claim
    Maersk now has its own colour. The Patent and Trademark Office has approved its shade of blue, which means no other company will be able to use it. Trademarks expert Hannah Holm Olsen told DR it was both unusual and difficult to get a colour protected. However, it is not the first, as the pump manufacturer Grundfos copyrighted a shade of red back in 2011. According to a Maersk survey, 84 percent of the respondents identified the blue colour with the shipper.

    Novo Nordisk and peers accused of causing deaths with insulin price hikes
    Outcry is growing in the US following the decision of most pharmaceutical companies to raise the price of insulin, and Novo Nordisk is getting caught in the crossfire. Some diabetics are unable to afford the drug, and a number of deaths have been reported, with some claiming that companies like Novo have blood on their hands in their pursuit of profits. Over the last 20 years, the price of some of Novo’s insulin drugs have risen by 300-400 percent.

    Jewellery company declared bankrupt after 29 years of operations
    The jewellery company Dyrberg / Kern, which at one point had a presence in 30 countries following its launch in 1990, has been declared bankrupt. Founded by Gitte Dyrberg and Henning Kern, the company had 15 employees. The company declared a loss of 39.5 million kroner in its last set of accounts, but was unable to turn things around.

    The perils of suddenly and unexpectedly replacing your chief executive
    Hospital equipment producer Ambu saw its shares slide by 20.4 percent last Friday after it announced the surprise replacement of its chief executive Lars Marcher with Juan-José Gonzales.  Marcher, the CEO for the past decade, is credited with taking Ambu from virtually nothing to becoming a member of the C25 in 2018. His severance package is estimated to be worth 305 million kroner.

    Danes content to leave their money in the bank acquiring no interest
    Some 900 billion kroner is currently being held in ordinary deposit accounts at Danish banks, according to Finans Danmark. The figures highlight how few Danes choose to invest their surplus cash, preferring just to leave it gathering next to no interest.

    Decision of Nordea risk manager to quit is damning, notes expert
    Nordea risk manager Julie Galbo will leave the bank at the end of May. Galbo was responsible for ensuring the bank adhered to legislation, and recent money laundering allegations suggest her eyes were off the ball at times. “It is difficult to see this as anything other than a sign of serious problems with the bank’s risk control,” observed DR financial correspondent Casper Schrøder to his employer.

    New chief executive for Dansk Industri
    Lars Sandahl Sørensen will take over as the new chief executive of Dansk Industri on August 1. The operations director at SAS will replace Karsten Dybvad who resigned in December to become the chair of Danske Bank. 3F chair Per Christensen has praised the appointment, telling DR that Sørensen is the right leader to find “solutions to some of the challenges that Danish companies and employees face”.

    New CEO for Danske Bank
    Chris Vogelzang has been confirmed as the new CEO of Danske Bank. The 56-year-old Dutchman will take over on June 1. Vogelzang worked for Dutch bank ABN Amro from 2000-2017, where he was responsible for retail and private banking during his final decade there, and will shortly leave his current position as an advisor to the Boston Consulting Group and Blackstone.

    CFO of Danske Bank faces criminal charges
    The Financial Supervisory Authority has confirmed that Henrik Ramlau-Hansen, the chief financial officer of Danske Bank, faces criminal charges in relation to the money-laundering activities that took place at the Estonian branch, where an estimated 1.5 trillion kroner passed through between 2007 and 2015. The bank’s former chief executive, Thomas Borgen, has already been charged.

    Povlsen family thank public for compassion
    Denmark’s richest man, Bestseller owner Anders Holch Povlsen, and his wife took out adverts in the Sunday editions of Aarhus Stiftstidende and Berlingske to thank the public for their compassion following the deaths of three of their four children – Alma, Agnes and Alfred – in the Sri Lanka bombings on April 21.

    BoldT setting up shop in Copenhagen
    Business strategy and communications consultancy BoldT has recruited Nikolaj Buchardt to set up a Copenhagen office. Since launching in Oslo in 2017, the company has expanded into four other countries. Buchardt is a former CEO of Halo.

    Denmark further down the financial inequality road than other Nordics

    Denmark further down the financial inequality road than other Nordics


    When it comes to the discrepancy in income between the richest Danes and the rest of the population, the country seems to be emulating British conditions. New figures from the think-tank Kraka in conjunction with consultancy firm Deloitte reveal that the...

    When it comes to the discrepancy in income between the richest Danes and the rest of the population, the country seems to be emulating British conditions.

    New figures from the think-tank Kraka in conjunction with consultancy firm Deloitte reveal that the richest Danes’ share of the country’s total income has risen to 11 percent – from around 7 percent in early 1990, reports Jyllands-Posten.

    This puts Denmark on a par with the UK and ahead of Norway and Sweden where the figure is around 8 percent.

    The trend has accelerated since the financial crisis and has been driven by top executive wages and increased income from accumulated wealth.

    Equality equates with stability
    “This is a development that unfortunately, most people can recognise. It’s not about envy, but about justice, reasonableness and social cohesion. An equal society is also a more stable one,” Peter Hummelgaard, Socialdemokratiet’s acting political spokesperson, told Jyllands-Posten.

    The party would like to reverse the trend by restricting the amount people can deduct on salaries over 10 million kroner and by introducing higher taxes on income from accumulated wealth.

    However, the finance minister, Kristian Jensen, is not worried. “Of course there is a limit to how unequal a society can become, but I don’t think Denmark is there yet. We shouldn’t fight wealth but poverty,” he said.

    Media: Eriksen set to join Real Madrid

    Media: Eriksen set to join Real Madrid


    According to the respected Spanish journalist Jaime Astrain, Danish international Christian Eriksen has already signed for Spanish giants Real Madrid. During a program on the TV station El Chiringuito, Astrain said the Danish midfielder would be...

    According to the respected Spanish journalist Jaime Astrain, Danish international Christian Eriksen has already signed for Spanish giants Real Madrid.

    During a program on the TV station El Chiringuito, Astrain said the Danish midfielder would be presented following the Champions League final on June 1 – a match that seems set to be Eriksen’s last for Tottenham.

    “According to the information I have, which is from a very reliable source, Real Madrid has tied down a player this coming season. It’s Eriksen from Tottenham. When the Champions League final ends, it will be unveiled,” said Astrain.

    READ MORE: Sports Round-Up: FC Midtjylland finally win Danish Cup final

    No Bale out
    Eriksen has long been a hot name in the rumour mill and, with his contract at Spurs coming to an end next year, he has been linked to Real Madrid a number of times.

    Astrain also professed to know that Tottenham were not interested in getting Gareth Bale back as part of the deal.

    Since joining Tottenham from Ajax back in 2013, Eriksen has scored 66 goals and dished out 86 assists in 276 appearances – including 10 goals and 17 assists so far this season.

    First since ‘Graver’
    According to football site Transfermarkt, the 27-year-old Dane is worth about 650 million kroner.

    The last Dane to turn out for Real Madrid was Thomas Graversen back in 2006 – a stay mostly remembered for an incident involving Robinho when he chased the slight Brazilian around the training pitch after a spat.

    Still, Real fans probably still remember ‘Graver’ well. He was a character to say the least (see video below).