Big Picture




    The inauguration of President Donald Trump

    The inauguration of President Donald Trump


    Donald Trump, who upended American politics and energized voters angry with Washington, was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States, putting Republicans back in control of the White House for the first time in eight years. US President...

    Donald Trump, who upended American politics and energized voters angry with Washington, was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States, putting Republicans back in control of the White House for the first time in eight years.

    US President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and their families watch a member of the Talladega College marching band perform during the Inaugural Parade. (Patrick Smith//Getty Images)

    Daily Life: January 2017

    Daily Life: January 2017


    For this edition of our look at daily life we share images from Serbia, East Timor, Portugal, Germany, United States, and other countries from around the world. -- By Lloyd YoungPuli Gin-Gin runs in the snow in its garden in Lautertal, southern...

    For this edition of our look at daily life we share images from Serbia, East Timor, Portugal, Germany, United States, and other countries from around the world. -- By Lloyd Young

    Puli Gin-Gin runs in the snow in its garden in Lautertal, southern Germany, on Jan. 5. Pulis are Hungarian sheepdogs and rarely seen in Germany. (Michael Probst/Associated Press)

    Dakar Rally 2017

    Dakar Rally 2017


    The 12-stage Dakar Rally is traveling through Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina via motorcycle, quad bike, car, or truck over extreme terrain. Competitors and support crews come from around the world to challenge their mechanical, driving, and...

    The 12-stage Dakar Rally is traveling through Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina via motorcycle, quad bike, car, or truck over extreme terrain. Competitors and support crews come from around the world to challenge their mechanical, driving, and orienteering skills. The race wraps up tomorrow in Buenos Aires, Argentina after covering the more than 5,450-miles. -- By Lloyd Young

    Spectators cheer as Jose Julian Kozac of Argentina and KTM Propia rides a 450 KTM bike during stage five of the 2017 Dakar Rally between Tupiza and Oruro Bolivia on Jan. 6. (Dan Istitene/Getty Images)

    Bear Ears Buttes in Utah

    Bear Ears Buttes in Utah


    Known as Bear Ears for the pair of purple buttes at the region’s center, the newly proclaimed 1.9 million-acre National Monument will preserve a photographer’s checklist of high-desert drama: spires, bridges, canyons. Yet the region’s true...

    Known as Bear Ears for the pair of purple buttes at the region’s center, the newly proclaimed 1.9 million-acre National Monument will preserve a photographer’s checklist of high-desert drama: spires, bridges, canyons. Yet the region’s true distinction is not its topography, but its cultural significance; perhaps no place in America is as rich with ancient Native American sites as Bear Ears. In October 2015, a coalition of five Indian nations, including the Hopi, Ute, and Navajo, formally proposed the monument, attempting to preserve the parcel’s 100,000 archeological sites from ongoing looting and grave robbing. Last June, in a letter to President Obama, more than 700 archeologists endorsed the proposal, saying that looting of the area’s many ancient kivas and dwellings was continuing “at an alarming pace” and calling Bear Ears “America’s most significant unprotected cultural landscape.” President Obama designated Bear Ears Butte and Gold Buttes in Nevada as protected National monuments at the end of last month. The incoming Trump administration, along with the Republican-controlled congress, and Utah state officials, could mount a legal challenge against that designation. -- By European Pressphoto Agency

    Muddy water fills a small slot canyon in the Bear Ears National Monument near Fry Canyon, Utah, USA on Nov.12. (Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA)

    Philippines antidrug crackdown

    Philippines antidrug crackdown


    Since he took office last June, President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines has launched a nationwide antidrug campaign that has so far reportedly led to the deaths of more than 6,000 people, who were allegedly killed in police raids or at the hands of...

    Since he took office last June, President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines has launched a nationwide antidrug campaign that has so far reportedly led to the deaths of more than 6,000 people, who were allegedly killed in police raids or at the hands of vigilante groups. National and international human rights groups have condemned the campaign and called on Duterte to stop the extrajudicial killings and ensure the protection and rights of people who use drugs. According to media reports, Duterte has rejected that the killings constituted a “crime against humanity”. Filipino presidential spokesperson, Ernesto Abella, while speaking on the administration’s accomplishment over the first six months of its crackdown on drug dealers and cartels, said that President Duterte’s anticrime campaign had resulted in the surrender of more than 900,000 drug addicts and the confiscation of billions of worth of illicit drugs. Abella added that the government had come to regard drugs not only as a national security threat but also a “public health issue” which resulted in the building of rehabilitation facilities all over the country. -- By European Pressphoto Agency

    Bystanders look on as funeral parlor workers prepare to transport the body of an alleged drug user who was shot down by unidentified men in Mandaluyong City, east of Manila, on Nov. 21, 2016. (Mark R. Cristino/EPA)

    Globe photos of the month, December 2016

    Globe photos of the month, December 2016


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, Seniors First Night, the beginning of ski season, “Boston Winter” in City Hall plaza, and the MIAA Super Bowl games. -- By Lloyd YoungFireworks display during the...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, Seniors First Night, the beginning of ski season, “Boston Winter” in City Hall plaza, and the MIAA Super Bowl games. -- By Lloyd Young

    Fireworks display during the city’s First Night celebration on Boston Common viewed from Suffolk University’s Rosalie K. Stahl Center. (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    The best Boston Globe photos of 2016

    The best Boston Globe photos of 2016


    Staff photographers share the stories behind the year’s most powerful pictures, selected by the editors of the Globe Magazine and the Boston Globe photo department. July 4 / BostonIt’s my second year covering the Boston Pops Independence Day concert....

    Staff photographers share the stories behind the year’s most powerful pictures, selected by the editors of the Globe Magazine and the Boston Globe photo department.

    July 4 / BostonIt’s my second year covering the Boston Pops Independence Day concert. Last year, I was facing the crowd. I remember people cheering and thinking it would be great if I could have all these hands raised in the background. I thought, I’ll just do that next year. So that’s what I did: I went back to the same place to make a similar image from the other side. It comes at the very end, as they’re playing the “1812 Overture,” the confetti has been shot in the sky, and everyone is cheering. (Keith Bedford/Globe Staff)

    The year 2016 in pictures: Part I

    The year 2016 in pictures: Part I


    Photographs from January to June on a range of topics from around the world. See Part II -- By Lloyd Young Fireworks light the sky over Copacabana beach during New Year's Eve celebrations in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Mauro Pimentel/Associated...

    Photographs from January to June on a range of topics from around the world. See Part II -- By Lloyd Young

    Fireworks light the sky over Copacabana beach during New Year's Eve celebrations in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Mauro Pimentel/Associated Press)

    The year 2016 in pictures: Part II

    The year 2016 in pictures: Part II


    Photographs from July to December on a range of topics from around the world. See Part I -- By Leanne Burden SeidelWomen react during the funeral of a victim of the failed July 15 coup attempt in Istanbul on July 17. Turkish President Recep Tayyip...

    Photographs from July to December on a range of topics from around the world. See Part I -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    Women react during the funeral of a victim of the failed July 15 coup attempt in Istanbul on July 17. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed to purge the “virus” within state bodies, during a speech at the funeral of victims killed during the coup bid he blames on his enemy Fethullah Gulen. (Gurcan Ozturk/AFP/Getty Images)

    Amazing animals 2016

    Amazing animals 2016


    A collection of images depicting many types of creatures around the world. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelArabian Oryx are seen at the Arabian Oryx Sanctuary in Umm Al-Zamool, some 290 kilometres south of Abu Dhabi near the border with Oman and Saudi...

    A collection of images depicting many types of creatures around the world. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    Arabian Oryx are seen at the Arabian Oryx Sanctuary in Umm Al-Zamool, some 290 kilometres south of Abu Dhabi near the border with Oman and Saudi Arabia, on March 1. The sanctuary which is reserve for many different animals stretches over an estimated area of 8,900 square kilometres and currently hosts nearly 155 Arabian Oryx, which were reintroduced into the its natural habitat in the UAE in a five-year conservation plan launched by UAE’s late ruler Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, after fears of their extinction. (Karim Sahib/AFP/Getty Images)

    The evolving ice of Antarctica

    The evolving ice of Antarctica


    NASA’s Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and conducted a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe...

    NASA’s Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and conducted a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. NASA and University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers have recently detected the speediest ongoing Western Antarctica glacial retreat rates ever observed. -- By Getty Images

    Ice near the coast of West Antarctica from a window of a NASA Operation IceBridge airplane on Oct. 27 in flight over Antarctica. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

    Becoming Santa

    Becoming Santa


    At the Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School in Midland, Mich., some two hundred Santas and Mrs. Clauses came from across the United States, Canada, Denmark and Norway to learn wood toy-making, brush up on storytelling skills, drive sleighs, feed reindeer...

    At the Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School in Midland, Mich., some two hundred Santas and Mrs. Clauses came from across the United States, Canada, Denmark and Norway to learn wood toy-making, brush up on storytelling skills, drive sleighs, feed reindeer and, most importantly, spread the Christmas spirit. Cookies are readily available at all times during the three-day training course on becoming Santa. -- By Reuters

    Santas disembark from a wagon following a tour around the Rooftop Landing Reindeer Farm in Clare, Mich. (Christinne Muschi/Reuters)

    Battle for Aleppo

    Battle for Aleppo


    After weeks of heavy fighting, regime forces pushed to take the last of the Syrian city of Aleppo. Thousands evacuated the devastated city, and the UN accused Assad forces of executing civilians as they closed in on the rebel-controlled areas. A cease...

    After weeks of heavy fighting, regime forces pushed to take the last of the Syrian city of Aleppo. Thousands evacuated the devastated city, and the UN accused Assad forces of executing civilians as they closed in on the rebel-controlled areas. A cease fire was reached, but then broken, leaving 50 thousand civilians trapped as fighting continues.

    A wounded Syrian woman from the al-Sukari neighborhood is helped onto the back of a truck as she flees during the ongoing government forces military operation to retake remaining rebel-held areas in the northern embattled city of Aleppo on Dec.14. Shelling and air strikes sent terrified residents running through the streets of Aleppo as a deal to evacuate rebel districts of the city was in danger of falling apart. (George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images)

    Winter is coming

    Winter is coming


    A look at wintry weather across the globe ahead of the start of the season that is fast approaching. Snow falls around the Space Needle, Dec. 8, in Seattle. A wintry mix of snow, ice and rain showered the area. (Grant Hindsley/seattlepi.com via...

    A look at wintry weather across the globe ahead of the start of the season that is fast approaching.

    Snow falls around the Space Needle, Dec. 8, in Seattle. A wintry mix of snow, ice and rain showered the area. (Grant Hindsley/seattlepi.com via AP)

    Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary

    Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary


    Thousands gathered in Hawaii today, 75 years after the attack that drew the United States into World War II. The Japanese air and naval strike on Pearl Harbor claimed more than 2,300 servicemen; destroyed over 160 aircraft; and beached, damaged or...

    Thousands gathered in Hawaii today, 75 years after the attack that drew the United States into World War II. The Japanese air and naval strike on Pearl Harbor claimed more than 2,300 servicemen; destroyed over 160 aircraft; and beached, damaged or destroyed more than 20 ships. President Franklin D. Roosevelt called it “a date which will live in infamy” when he addressed the Congress the next day asking to declare war on Japan.

    The USS Halsey performs a Pass-in-Review during a ceremony commemorating the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at Kilo Pier on Dec. 7 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (Kent Nishimura/Getty Images)

    Fidel Castro: polarizing icon

    Fidel Castro: polarizing icon


    People mourned and celebrated the death of the controversial and revolutionary leader of Cuba, Fidel Castro. Portraits of Castro appeared everywhere this week: in Cuban homes and streets, and in the hands of people around the world. A man shows his...

    People mourned and celebrated the death of the controversial and revolutionary leader of Cuba, Fidel Castro. Portraits of Castro appeared everywhere this week: in Cuban homes and streets, and in the hands of people around the world.

    A man shows his poster of late Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro in his home in Havana on Nov. 29, as tributes to the former president are being held across the country. Castro died late November 25 in Havana at age 90. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

    Art for the public

    Art for the public


    A look at how artists around the world are transforming shared spaces. Photographers captured recent exhibitions and permanent works on display in various locations for all to experience. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelPeople are seen on giant fried eggs...

    A look at how artists around the world are transforming shared spaces. Photographers captured recent exhibitions and permanent works on display in various locations for all to experience. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    People are seen on giant fried eggs art installation as part of “Hecho en Casa” (Made at home) urban artwork festival in downtown Santiago, Chile, Nov. 8. (Pablo Sanhueza/Reuters)

    Globe photos of the month, November 2016

    Globe photos of the month, November 2016


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including the presidential election, pipeline protests at Standing Rock, N.D., and Thanksgiving Day football games. -- By Lloyd YoungProtestors at the Massachusetts...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including the presidential election, pipeline protests at Standing Rock, N.D., and Thanksgiving Day football games. -- By Lloyd Young

    Protestors at the Massachusetts State House took part in a National Day of Action Fight for a $15-an-hour minimum wage. (Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff)

    Training Afghanistan’s women soldiers

    Training Afghanistan’s women soldiers


    Kabul’s military training academy is churning out classes of enthusiastic women to serve in Afghanistan’s army, but the realities of rising violence and a conservative society make the future for the young recruits far from certain. In the latest...

    Kabul’s military training academy is churning out classes of enthusiastic women to serve in Afghanistan’s army, but the realities of rising violence and a conservative society make the future for the young recruits far from certain. In the latest class, some of the nearly 150 women training to be officers say they feel proud to be part of the effort to secure the country, still racked by an insurgency waged by Islamist militants to topple the Western-backed government. -- By Reuters

    Soldiers Karima Mohamadi, 21 (left), and Tamana, 19, from the Afghan National Army (ANA) clean their weapons at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan om Oct. 26. (Mohammad Ismail/Reuters)

    Signs of reaction

    Signs of reaction


    Emotions run high after the presidential election, as Americans and the world react to the outcome. Protests have erupted throughout the country, as the nation becomes increasingly divided in the wake of Donald Trump’s victory. -- By Leanne Burden...

    Emotions run high after the presidential election, as Americans and the world react to the outcome. Protests have erupted throughout the country, as the nation becomes increasingly divided in the wake of Donald Trump’s victory. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    A protester against President-elect Donald Trump holds a sign as he jogs around Lake Merritt in Oakland, Calif., Nov. 13. (Noah Berger/Reuters)

    Election Day 2016

    Election Day 2016


    Americans head to the polls today across the nation to select the next president, other political seats, and a number of ballot questions. As day turned to night, the country witnessed a presidential election for the ages with Donald Trump becoming...

    Americans head to the polls today across the nation to select the next president, other political seats, and a number of ballot questions. As day turned to night, the country witnessed a presidential election for the ages with Donald Trump becoming elected president..

    Donald Trump celebrates with his running mate Mike Pence (left) as he speaks to supporters at Donald Trump's Election Night event at the New York Hilton Midtown. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    Spain’s “Pueblos Blancos”

    Spain’s “Pueblos Blancos”


    Dazzling clusters of cube-shaped houses perched on top of Andalusia’s olive tree-studded mountains, the “Pueblos Blancos”, or white villages, are named for the lime wash the buildings are painted with to keep the interiors cool. The labyrinths of...

    Dazzling clusters of cube-shaped houses perched on top of Andalusia’s olive tree-studded mountains, the “Pueblos Blancos”, or white villages, are named for the lime wash the buildings are painted with to keep the interiors cool. The labyrinths of narrow alleyways are a throwback to when this Spanish region was known as Al-Andalus, and was part of a medieval Muslim territory. While this region is stunningly beautiful and a big draw to tourists visiting the south of Spain, it is also one of the poorest areas in the country and has one of the highest unemployment rates in the European Union. -- By Reuters

    Pilgrims make their way to the shrine of Christ of Romeral as they ride past the white village of Arcos de la Frontera, southern Spain, Sept. 11, 2016. (Marcelo del Pozo/Reuters)

    Globe photos of the month, October 2016

    Globe photos of the month, October 2016


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including Halloween, fall color, life in the Theater District, and the end of the David Ortiz era. -- By Lloyd YoungAnson Knoblach, 10, of Chandler, Ariz., plays inside...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including Halloween, fall color, life in the Theater District, and the end of the David Ortiz era. -- By Lloyd Young

    Anson Knoblach, 10, of Chandler, Ariz., plays inside a model of the Apollo command module.at the Museum of Science in Cambridge. (Lane Turner/Globe Staff)

    Autumn brilliance

    Autumn brilliance


    Photographers around the world capture colorful scenes of fall. Foliage transforms our landscapes into a sea of vibrant hues, as the seasonal light sets it aglow. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelTrees show their full colors, as a woman passes along the calm...

    Photographers around the world capture colorful scenes of fall. Foliage transforms our landscapes into a sea of vibrant hues, as the seasonal light sets it aglow. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    Trees show their full colors, as a woman passes along the calm water of Reservoir Park in Brookline, Mass. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    The battle to recapture Mosul

    The battle to recapture Mosul


    Iraqi and Kurdish forces have begun a military offensive to take back the ISIS-controlled city of Mosul. Leaders say liberating this city will be difficult and could take months. More than a million civilians are thought to be trapped in the city that...

    Iraqi and Kurdish forces have begun a military offensive to take back the ISIS-controlled city of Mosul. Leaders say liberating this city will be difficult and could take months. More than a million civilians are thought to be trapped in the city that was captured by ISIS two years ago. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    Smoke rises from Islamic state positions after an airstrike by coalition forces in Mosul, Iraq, Oct. 18. The pace of operations slowed on Tuesday as Iraqi forces began pushing toward larger villages and encountering civilian populations on the second day of a massive operation to retake the northern Iraqi city of Mosul from the Islamic State group. (Associated Press)

    Traveling back in time on the Mattapan trolley

    Traveling back in time on the Mattapan trolley


    The trolleys that rolled out of Worcester’s Pullman-Standard factory in 1944 and 1945 are still rolling, seven decades later, along Boston’s most scenic commute. Traveling from Ashmont Station in Dorchester to Mattapan, they cross through Milton...

    The trolleys that rolled out of Worcester’s Pullman-Standard factory in 1944 and 1945 are still rolling, seven decades later, along Boston’s most scenic commute. Traveling from Ashmont Station in Dorchester to Mattapan, they cross through Milton woods frequented by deer, coyotes, and all manner of birds. The 2.6-mile journey, cutting across Cedar Grove Cemetery and running parallel to the colorful murals of the Neponset River Greenway, is over in 10 minutes. The cars of the Mattapan-Ashmont high-speed line — named not for blazing speed, but for the dedicated right-of-way intersected only twice by city streets — have a history that dates back even further than their seven decades of service, says transportation historian Bradley H. Clarke. They were designed early in the Great Depression by the Electric Railway Presidents Conference Committee, a group formed to create trolleys that would serve cities across the nation. Of the 346 PCC cars originally purchased for various Boston lines, 10 are left, all of them plying this route. “They are the oldest cars in the entire MBTA system,” Clarke says. -- By Lane Turner/Globe Staff

    A trolley passes one of many murals on the Neponset River Greenway, which runs alongside much of the route of the Mattapan High Speed Line. (Lane Turner/Globe Staff)

    Boston’s Theatre District

    Boston’s Theatre District


    Photographer Craig F. Walker spent time documenting the scene in Boston’s lively Theatre District. At the edge of diverse neighborhoods, the area is full of art, entertainment, and history. Many walks of life cross paths on the streets that are home to...

    Photographer Craig F. Walker spent time documenting the scene in Boston’s lively Theatre District. At the edge of diverse neighborhoods, the area is full of art, entertainment, and history. Many walks of life cross paths on the streets that are home to a bustling nightlife.

    Keith Clark of Boston smokes a cigar outside L.J.Peretti Co. on Charles Street in the Theatre District. (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    Farewell Big Papi

    Farewell Big Papi


    Red Sox slugger David Oritz ended his career with the team this season. Here’s a look back at some highlights from his 14-year run. -- By Bill GreeneRetiring Red Sox slugger David Ortiz salutes the fans at Fenway Park following game three of the ALDS...

    Red Sox slugger David Oritz ended his career with the team this season. Here’s a look back at some highlights from his 14-year run. -- By Bill Greene

    Retiring Red Sox slugger David Ortiz salutes the fans at Fenway Park following game three of the ALDS on Oct. 10. The Cleveland Indians knocked the Sox out of the playoffs. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    Farm to table meals

    Farm to table meals


    The fruits and veggies served to the homeless residents of Boston’s Pine Street Inn are usually grocery store cast-offs. But the Cambridge nonprofit Food For Free is now growing produce at a Lincoln farm specifically for the Pine Street Inn, which...

    The fruits and veggies served to the homeless residents of Boston’s Pine Street Inn are usually grocery store cast-offs. But the Cambridge nonprofit Food For Free is now growing produce at a Lincoln farm specifically for the Pine Street Inn, which means copious quantities of kale, beets, and other fresh veggies for shelter guests.

    Jonathan Hayden, field manager for Lindentree Farm and farm manager for Food For Free, harvests produce at Lindentree Farm specifically for the Pine Street Inn, which is allowing homeless patrons to regularly eat high-quality fresh vegetables. (Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff)

    Hurricane Matthew

    Hurricane Matthew


    Hurricane Matthew, the most powerful Atlantic storm in nearly a decade, left a path of destruction over the Caribbean and the southern US. Hundreds have been killed, and it is feared that Haiti suffered catastrophic damage. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelA...

    Hurricane Matthew, the most powerful Atlantic storm in nearly a decade, left a path of destruction over the Caribbean and the southern US. Hundreds have been killed, and it is feared that Haiti suffered catastrophic damage. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    A couple embrace in the remains of their home that was destroyed by Hurricane Matthew in Baracoa, Cuba, Oct. 5. The hurricane rolled across the sparsely populated tip of Cuba overnight, destroying dozens of homes in Cuba’s easternmost city, Baracoa, leaving hundreds of others damaged. (Ramon Espinosa/Associated Press)

    Globe photos of the month, September 2016

    Globe photos of the month, September 2016


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including Boston Light turning 300yrs old, remembering the September 11th attacks, Allston Christmas, and the start of the Patriots regular season. -- By Lloyd...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including Boston Light turning 300yrs old, remembering the September 11th attacks, Allston Christmas, and the start of the Patriots regular season. -- By Lloyd Young

    Scotti Sciara, 7, of Salem, N.H., rolls down the grass-covered hills that grace the front of the New Balance headquarters on Guest Street. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    Oktoberfest 2016

    Oktoberfest 2016


    The taps are open at the world’s biggest beer festival in Germany that runs until Oct. 3. The event dates to 1810, when Crown Prince Ludwig married Princess Therese and the people of Munich were invited to attend the festivities. Lager beer brewed only...

    The taps are open at the world’s biggest beer festival in Germany that runs until Oct. 3. The event dates to 1810, when Crown Prince Ludwig married Princess Therese and the people of Munich were invited to attend the festivities. Lager beer brewed only in Munich is served at the festival to the estimated 5 million to 7 million people who attend. -- By Lloyd Young

    Visitors reach for the one of the first mugs of beer during the opening day of the 183rd Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, on Sept. 17. (Michaela Rehle/Reuters)

    Moon shots

    Moon shots


    The moon is captured by photographers from many different spots on earth, from different perspectives. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelA full harvest moon rises near the Scituate Lighthouse as a crowd stood on the breakwater next to it to watch it rise. ...

    The moon is captured by photographers from many different spots on earth, from different perspectives. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    A full harvest moon rises near the Scituate Lighthouse as a crowd stood on the breakwater next to it to watch it rise. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    South Africa motorbike racing

    South Africa motorbike racing


    Not far from the refurbished F1 race track of Kyalami in Johannesburg, South Africa is a small, virtually dirt race track that attracts only the brave and rare “petrol heads” on some Sundays to race against each other in the hot sun for bragging...

    Not far from the refurbished F1 race track of Kyalami in Johannesburg, South Africa is a small, virtually dirt race track that attracts only the brave and rare “petrol heads” on some Sundays to race against each other in the hot sun for bragging rights and a trophy. The track is home to the Walkerville Speedway Racers Club that includes flat track racers, sidecar racers and a new breed; the Stof Kop (dust cup) racers. -- By European Pressphoto Agency

    Speedway racer, Neil Pettit powerslides his motorbike into the corner during a race at the Walkerville Dirt Oval south of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Aug. 28. Speedway racing sees four to six racers riding against each other around a oval dirt race track on motorbikes that don’t have breaks or gears. They use the throttle and balance to powerslide around the two corners on the track. (Kim Ludbrook/EPA)

    Paralympics 2016

    Paralympics 2016


    Competing at many of the same Rio venues as participants in the summer Olympics, more than 4,000 athletes from 170 plus nations are taking part in the first edition of the South American Paralympic Games. The athletes compete in more than 20 sports that...

    Competing at many of the same Rio venues as participants in the summer Olympics, more than 4,000 athletes from 170 plus nations are taking part in the first edition of the South American Paralympic Games. The athletes compete in more than 20 sports that have various classifications, depending on an athlete’s level of impairment. The Games conclude Sept. 18.

    Terezinha Guilhermina of Brazil competes with her guide Rafael Lazarini in the men's 400m T54 heat two at Olympic Stadium during day five of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games on Sept. 12. (Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

    Back to school

    Back to school


    A look at children around the world starting school after their summer break. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelFirst-grader Dominik Rosebush, 6, center, raises his hand, trying to get teacher Mindy Parrott to call on him for the answer to a question as...

    A look at children around the world starting school after their summer break. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    First-grader Dominik Rosebush, 6, center, raises his hand, trying to get teacher Mindy Parrott to call on him for the answer to a question as students attend their first day of school on Aug. 22 at Central Elementary School in Davison. (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

    Globe photos of the month, August 2016

    Globe photos of the month, August 2016


    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including the Marshfield Fair, Red Bull Flugtag competition, a puppy swim, and the Caribbean Carnival Parade in Dorchester. -- By Lloyd YoungAntonio Davis lifted his...

    Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including the Marshfield Fair, Red Bull Flugtag competition, a puppy swim, and the Caribbean Carnival Parade in Dorchester. -- By Lloyd Young

    Antonio Davis lifted his grandson Zayden Lopez, 1½, into the air at the annual Caribbean Carnival Parade in Dorchester. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

    A camp of care

    A camp of care


    Finding safe, enriching, and affordable summer camp for typical children is often a challenge for parents. But for children with complex physical, behavioral, and intellectual needs, that search is even more difficult. At Franciscan Children’s in...

    Finding safe, enriching, and affordable summer camp for typical children is often a challenge for parents. But for children with complex physical, behavioral, and intellectual needs, that search is even more difficult. At Franciscan Children’s in Brighton, several weeks of summer camps are offered so that children and families feel supported year round. “Just because a child can’t stand independently doesn’t mean they shouldn’t get to hit a baseball,” says Franciscan CEO John D. Nash. “We’re about focusing on possibilities, not the child’s limitations.” -- By Suzanne Kreiter

    A visually impaired camper and staff member parade around the grounds as part of a special Olympic-themed summer camp session “We have high expectations for the children we serve. We want them to do everything that’s possible for them,” says Bonnie Paulino, program director of the Kennedy Day School. (Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff)

    Reflection (Defined)

    Reflection (Defined)


    reflection (noun) 1. the throwing back by a body or surface of light, heat, or sound without absorbing it. Editor’s Note: “Defined” is an occasional series exploring the definitions of words via photography. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelA woman...

    reflection (noun) 1. the throwing back by a body or surface of light, heat, or sound without absorbing it. Editor’s Note: “Defined” is an occasional series exploring the definitions of words via photography. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    A woman looks on while riding the tramway as Turkey’s flag is reflected in the window in Taksim square in Istanbul on July 22, following the failed military coup attempt of July 15. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

    Ghosts from a failed system

    Ghosts from a failed system


    Westborough State Hospital, formerly known as the Westborough Insane Hospital, was built in the 1800s on hope and compassion. But with little scientific knowledge of mental illness, institutions like Westborough eventually became wretched warehouses. ...

    Westborough State Hospital, formerly known as the Westborough Insane Hospital, was built in the 1800s on hope and compassion. But with little scientific knowledge of mental illness, institutions like Westborough eventually became wretched warehouses. Civil rights activists, disability rights lawyers and politicians made it their mission to end the harsh restrictions imposed on people with mental illness, and the remedy was to close institutions like Westborough, which was shuttered in 2010. As part of the Spotlight team report on mental illness, Boston Globe photographer Suzanne Kreiter toured the abandoned hospital. “I know that technically these photographs have no people in them,” Kreiter says, “but they’re all right there. All these images contain the ghosts of the people who need our help the most.” -- By Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe staff photographer

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    Deadly earthquake hits Italy

    Deadly earthquake hits Italy


    Search and rescue crews are using whatever they can to locate survivors from a magnitude 6.2 earthquake that reduced three central Italian towns to rubble early today. The death toll stood at 120, but certainly will rise said officials. ‘‘The town...

    Search and rescue crews are using whatever they can to locate survivors from a magnitude 6.2 earthquake that reduced three central Italian towns to rubble early today. The death toll stood at 120, but certainly will rise said officials. ‘‘The town isn’t here anymore,’’ said Sergio Pirozzi, the mayor of the hardest-hit town, Amatrice. -- By Lloyd Young

    A man is rescued from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, on Aug. 2. (Remo Casilli/Reuters)

    Flooding in Louisiana

    Flooding in Louisiana


    Louisiana continues to deal with the disastrous affects of historic flooding that killed at least 17 and destroyed about 60,000 homes. -- By Leanne Burden SeidelLeslie Andermann Gallagher surveys the flood damage to her home on Aug. 17 in Sorrento,...

    Louisiana continues to deal with the disastrous affects of historic flooding that killed at least 17 and destroyed about 60,000 homes. -- By Leanne Burden Seidel

    Leslie Andermann Gallagher surveys the flood damage to her home on Aug. 17 in Sorrento, Louisiana. Last week Louisiana was overwhelmed with flood water causing at least thirteen deaths and thousands of homes damaged by the flood waters. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

    Family fun and nostalgia on New England’s beaches

    Family fun and nostalgia on New England’s beaches


    As the sun sets for the night on Palace Playland in Old Orchard Beach, Maine, owner Joel Golder says, “Once this amusement park is gone . . . it’s gone. We’re the only beachfront amusement park left in New England.” He says he loves his...

    As the sun sets for the night on Palace Playland in Old Orchard Beach, Maine, owner Joel Golder says, “Once this amusement park is gone . . . it’s gone. We’re the only beachfront amusement park left in New England.” He says he loves his family’s business. “I’ve been doing this all my life. The smells, the sounds, there’s nothing like it.” It’s said that the boardwalk atmosphere and these nostalgic slices of Americana are disappearing. But if one looks closely, remnants of the past can still be found on the shores of New England. As Fran Amero drives his 1927 Model T four-door Roadster up Ocean Boulevard, he says the car makes him feel connected to New Hampshire’s Hampton Beach. “It’s like I’ve been here before at a different time. I feel like I’m back in the day.” There are still places that allow us to feel safe and share our own childhood with our children. As Alicia Mullings cradles a pile of tickets for her son Marc, 10, at the Dream Machine arcade at Nantasket Beach in Hull, Mass., she says, “I’ve been coming here since I was a kid; it’s fun to see him having fun doing the same things I did as a kid. We don’t go to the arcade all the time, it’s special.” Golder encourages people to take advantage of this history, “We’re not going to be here forever. . . . This is a place filled with good memories of happier times. . . . We like to deliver happiness.” -- By Craig F. Walker

    With Palace Playland in the background, Jenny Gouthro, 12, of Salem, N.H., works her back handspring at Old Orchard Beach in Maine. “She could do that all day. She has to get her practice in; she does gymnastics five hours every day,” says her mother, Melissa Gouthro. “I’ve been coming here since I was probably her age.” (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    Remembering Hurricane Bob

    Remembering Hurricane Bob


    Twenty-five years ago this week, Hurricane Bob swept through New England, leaving six dead in Connecticut and causing $680 million in damage in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island were hit hardest by...

    Twenty-five years ago this week, Hurricane Bob swept through New England, leaving six dead in Connecticut and causing $680 million in damage in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island were hit hardest by the Category 2 storm, said the National Weather Service office in Taunton. At times, sustained winds of 100 miles per hour were recorded, as well as gusts up to 125 miles per hour. Houses, boats, and beaches saw severe and, at times, irreparable damage in a marginal area of Buzzards Bay and parts of the Cape.

    Two men watch the boats in the harbor as some come off their mooring and crash into the pier at Mattapoisett during Hurricane Bob. (John tlumacki/Globe Staff/File 1991)

    Golden moments in Rio

    Golden moments in Rio


    More than halfway through the Summer Olympic games in Rio, over 150 gold medals have been awarded. Here are some of the winners whose performances during competition earned them the top spot on the podium. -- By Lloyd YoungGold medalist Emese Szasz,...

    More than halfway through the Summer Olympic games in Rio, over 150 gold medals have been awarded. Here are some of the winners whose performances during competition earned them the top spot on the podium. -- By Lloyd Young

    Gold medalist Emese Szasz, center, of Hungary, leaps onto the podium during a medal ceremony for the women's individual epee fencing match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Szasz is joined by silver medal winner Rossella Fiamingo, left, of Italy, and bronze medalist Sun Yiwen, of China. (Jae C. Hong/Associated Press)

    Farmer Olympics in Vermont

    Farmer Olympics in Vermont


    With the world’s attention focused on the Olympic Games in Brazil, a decidedly different type of competition was held in a small corner of New England, as farmers took to the field for the second annual Farmer Olympics in Vershire, Vt. After taking...

    With the world’s attention focused on the Olympic Games in Brazil, a decidedly different type of competition was held in a small corner of New England, as farmers took to the field for the second annual Farmer Olympics in Vershire, Vt. After taking part in warm-up events that included a hay bale toss, the crowd gathered for an opening ceremony where a quartet performed the Olympic theme song on kazoo. When the competition began, 60 farmers sprinted up a hill, empty bins and shovels in hand, for the manure relay. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont. In the end it was a team from Cedar Circle Farm in East Stepford who took the gold. Their team’s name? Soil’d. -- By Jessica Rinaldi

    Niko Horster of Shire Beef holds the torch during the opening ceremony of the second annual Farmer Olympics held at Broad Acres Farm in Vershire, Vt., on Aug. 9. (Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff)

    Gang of Christ in Mexico

    Gang of Christ in Mexico


    In the troubled fringes of the northern Mexican city of Monterrey, an aspiring priest is using his faith to reach out to young gang members and at-risk youth, and bring them into his “Gang of Christ.” Less than 200 kilometers from the United States...

    In the troubled fringes of the northern Mexican city of Monterrey, an aspiring priest is using his faith to reach out to young gang members and at-risk youth, and bring them into his “Gang of Christ.” Less than 200 kilometers from the United States border, Monterrey is a wealthy city of corporate trailblazers. But violence is never far away on the outskirts, where bricklayers and factory workers walk poorly lit streets to reach simple cinderblock homes. Jorge Luis Guerra, 34, also walks those pathways, searching for young gang members who might listen to his message. -- By Reuters

    An aspiring Catholic priest Jose Luis Guerra, a member of Raza Nueva in Christ, a project of the archdiocese of Monterrey drives his car towards a neighborhood in the municipality of Garcia in Monterrey, Mexico, on July 12. (Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

    Rio Olympic Games Opening Ceremonies

    Rio Olympic Games Opening Ceremonies


    The Rio Olympic Games officially got underway Friday night with Opening Ceremonies at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro. The Games are being held for the first time in South America, and more than 11,000 athletes from over 200 countries will be...

    The Rio Olympic Games officially got underway Friday night with Opening Ceremonies at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro. The Games are being held for the first time in South America, and more than 11,000 athletes from over 200 countries will be competing. -- By Lloyd Young

    Fireworks illuminate the sky over the Maracana Stadium as athletes take photographs during the Opening Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA)

    Cod and community rebound in Newfoundland

    Cod and community rebound in Newfoundland


    In Newfoundland, where tens of thousands of people lost their jobs after the Canadian government banned the fishing of cod in 1992, there’s something new in the salty air of many of the island’s old, neglected fishing towns. As the iconic cod...

    In Newfoundland, where tens of thousands of people lost their jobs after the Canadian government banned the fishing of cod in 1992, there’s something new in the salty air of many of the island’s old, neglected fishing towns. As the iconic cod population finally rebounds after nearly a quarter century of historic decline, there’s a sense of hope, a promise of better days to come.

    Craig Purchase, associate professor of biology at Memorial University of Newfoundland, uses a net to gather capelin for his research at Middle Cove Beach in Newfoundland. The silver fish spawning on the shore is the primary food source for cod. (Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

    Rio locals reflect on upcoming Olympics

    Rio locals reflect on upcoming Olympics


    Before Rio de Janeiro host South America’s first Olympics, city residents expressed mixed feelings about the cost and security of the Games, while holding out hope they will bring joy to a nation facing economic and political crises. The conflicted...

    Before Rio de Janeiro host South America’s first Olympics, city residents expressed mixed feelings about the cost and security of the Games, while holding out hope they will bring joy to a nation facing economic and political crises. The conflicted thoughts mirror a recent survey by the Datafolha polling group showing that half of Brazilians were opposed to holding the Games, while 63 percent think the costs of hosting the event will outweigh benefits. -- By Pilar Olivares/Reuters

    Student and acrobat Guilherme Barbosa, at Ipanema beach in Rio de Janeiro. “Those in a position to rent out rooms in their houses can earn extra income, as well as those who work in the tourism industry. But most people are abandoned in precarious health and education services.” If there was a vote, he would cast against the Olympics. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)