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    Two Killed When World War II-Era Tank Explodes While Crew Was Filming

    Two Killed When World War II-Era Tank Explodes While Crew Was Filming


    BEND, Ore. (CBS Local) – Two people died inside a World War II-era tank at an Oregon firing range. “This is a tragic day,” Deschutes Sheriff Shane Nelson told KTVZ-TV. “Two families lost loved ones, and our hearts and prayers go out to those that...

    BEND, Ore. (CBS Local) – Two people died inside a World War II-era tank at an Oregon firing range.

    “This is a tragic day,” Deschutes Sheriff Shane Nelson told KTVZ-TV. “Two families lost loved ones, and our hearts and prayers go out to those that loved ones today.”

    The tank had been a fixture at Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range for several years.

    Police say someone was taking a video when the explosion occurred, and investigators will carefully study that video for clues as to what caused the blast.

    “There was a camera crew on scene, and they were filming the tank,” the sheriff explained. “As to what they were filming or why they were filming, those details haven’t been found out yet.

    “One of the victims was still alive (when police arrived), and they were able to speak with that victim. Bend Fire Department did attempt life-saving efforts on that victim, but the victim died.”

    (TM and © Copyright 2015 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2015 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

    New Orleans Tourist Paralyzed Following Brutal Attack

    New Orleans Tourist Paralyzed Following Brutal Attack


    NEW ORLEANS (CBS Local)– A California man who visits New Orleans regularly was left paralyzed after a brutal attack where he was beaten in an apparent road-rage incident. Authorities say the tourist remains in a New Orleans hospital where loved ones...

    NEW ORLEANS (CBS Local)– A California man who visits New Orleans regularly was left paralyzed after a brutal attack where he was beaten in an apparent road-rage incident.

    Authorities say the tourist remains in a New Orleans hospital where loved ones are concerned that a search for the attacker has only begun 11 days later, as reported by WDSU.

    Friends and family say the 64-year-old victim, Doug David, has been visiting New Orleans at least twice a year for the last two decades.

    “He goes to hear music, he goes dancing, he loves the food, he loves the people and he made a lot of friends,” David’s longtime friend Stephen Simpson told WDSU.

    But now, it’s possible that the man will never walk again.

    “It’s hard to believe that he’s going to be just stuck in a bed the rest of his life,” Simpson said.

    Surveillance video shows David moments before the attack, but does not document him being knocked down by an angry driver who reportedly sped through a stop sign and came close to hitting him.

    Police say they received a report of battery on Oct. 15 around 11 p.m., but when they arrived at the scene more than a half hour later the victim was nowhere to be found. A witness told police a black man was seen attacking a man and then zooming away in a small black car with a reported license plate XQT199.

    Officials say they received a call on Oct. 26 from family members and then went to the hospital to interview the victim. David told authorities he was almost hit by a small black vehicle and then threw his beer can at the car, hitting the roof.

    “The kid immediately stopped, jumped out and I was like he’s about to hit him. I knew he was going to hit him, and he hit him one time jumped back in his car and left and I watched the guy fall. His neck hit the curb and his head hit the street,” an anonymous witness recalled.

    The witness then went to help David.

    “I was one of the first people over there. I just asked if he was OK. He responded, he was able to talk, he told me his name and he told me where he was going,” he added.

    Police say the suspect  “struck him in the face/head area. The victim said after being punched, all he remembers is waking up and being unable to feel his arms and legs,” as reported by WDSU.

    Friends say that David is now paralyzed from the neck down and struggles to speak. Simpson says it took police 11 days to begin searching for the suspect.

    “We’re so hurt by what’s happened to Doug, that it’s easy to be mad at the police for something, but it’s really whoever did this that needs to be brought in,” Simpson said.

    Police say they were unaware that the victim had been taken to the hospital when they arrived at the empty crime scene.

    “It’s awful to witness it, It’s awful for our community. There was no need for it, and it looks so bad on us,” the witness told WDSU.

    Friends are raising money for David as expensive medical costs build up. Simpson is aiming to raise $20,000 for the victim through a crowd-funding site. The page reached almost $12,000 as of Wednesday afternoon.

    FDA Approves First-Of-A-Kind Drug Using Herpes Virus To Destroy Cancer Tumors

    FDA Approves First-Of-A-Kind Drug Using Herpes Virus To Destroy Cancer Tumors


    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials on Tuesday approved a first-of-a-kind drug that uses the herpes virus to infiltrate and destroy deadly skin cancer tumors. The Food and Drug Administration approved the injectable drug from Amgen Inc. for...

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials on Tuesday approved a first-of-a-kind drug that uses the herpes virus to infiltrate and destroy deadly skin cancer tumors.

    The Food and Drug Administration approved the injectable drug from Amgen Inc. for patients with hard-to-treat melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer that is expected to be diagnosed in 74,000 U.S. patients this year. For now, the drug is only approved for melanoma tumors that cannot be removed surgically.

    The drug, Imlygic, is injected directly into tumor tissue, where it uses herpes as a Trojan horse to slip past and rupture cancer cells. The drug combines a gene snippet meant to stimulate the immune system with a modified version of the herpes simplex virus — the kind that causes mouth cold sores.

    Despite the drug’s groundbreaking approach, FDA officials stressed it has not been shown to extend life. Instead, company studies showed that about 16 percent of patients injected with the drug saw their tumors shrink, compared with 2 percent of patients who took more conventional cancer drugs. That effect lasted at least six months.

    Regulators stressed that Imlygic had no effect on melanoma that had spread to the brain, lungs or other internal organs.

    Amgen said patients should be treated with the drug for at least six months, or until there are no more tumors left to treat. The company estimates one course of treatment will cost about $65,000, depending on the length of treatment.

    Doctors give an initial round of injections, followed by a second dose three weeks later and then regular injections every two weeks thereafter.

    The drug — known chemically as talimogene laherparepvec or T-VEC — divides into copies repeatedly until the membranes, or outer layers, of the cancer cells burst. Meanwhile, the gene snippet churns out a protein to stimulate an immune response to kill melanoma cells in the tumor and elsewhere in the body.

    Over the years, scientists have explored altering various viruses, including measles and polio, to combat several types of cancer, including brain tumors, breast cancers and others.

    A 2013 review in the journal Molecular Cancer concluded that cancer-fighting viruses armed with genes that stimulate the immune system “are potent therapeutic cancer vaccines.”

    The FDA has approved a string of new medicines dubbed immunotherapies, or immune-oncology drugs, that harness the body’s immune system to help attack cancer cells. The drugs have brought some of the first significant advances in patient survival in many years for some cancer types, particularly lung cancer and melanoma.

    Melanoma was long considered one of the toughest cancers to treat, with few drug options available up until a few years ago. But since 2011, the FDA has approved seven new drugs for the form of skin cancer, including Merck & Co.’s Keytruda, and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Yervoy and Opdivo. All three drugs work by blocking a protein found in certain tumors called PD-1, which inhibits the body’s natural response to cancer cells.

    Shares of Amgen Inc., which is based in Thousand Oaks, California, rose $3.40, or 2.1 percent, to close Tuesday at $161.98.

    (© Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

    Daily News Tips from CBS LOCAL Sites

    Daily News Tips from CBS LOCAL Sites


    Welcome to the Daily Story Stream from CBS Local. This page will be updated around the clock daily. Here’s a look at the top stories people are talking about across our network of CBS Local sites...

    Welcome to the Daily Story Stream from CBS Local. This page will be updated around the clock daily. Here’s a look at the top stories people are talking about across our network of CBS Local sites today: